Rehmat's World

Princess Diana and Dodi after 20 years

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On August 31, 2017, Egyptian-born British billionaire and former owner of London’s Harrods, Mohamed Al-Fayyad privately marked the 20th anniversary of his son Emad El-Din Mohamed Abdel Muna’im Al-Fayed better known as Dodi and princess Diana’s death on Sakara yacht in St. Tropez. This the same yacht on which princess Diana and her two sons, prince William and prince Harry took a vacation with Dodi in summer 1997, shortly before they were both killed in a car accident.

Al-Fayyad still insists that both lovers were killed by British security services just a few hours of announcing their plan to marry – because the royal family didn’t want princes Diana to marry a Muslim.

Tina Brown in her 2008 book, The Diana Chronicle, claims that princes Diana was product of Jewish banker Sir James Goldsmith’s love affair with Frances Shand Kydd (Jewish), wife of Earl Spencer.

Sir James Goldsmith’s daughter Jemima Goldsmith, a friend of princess Diana, converted to Islam at age 21 and married world-renowned Pakistani cricketer turned politician Imran Khan in 1995.

On August 14, 2013, Sarah Ellison wrote at the Vanity fair that princess Diana had a 2-year love affair with Pakistani-born Hasnat Khan, a heart surgeon at the Royal Brompton Hospital and that it’s Dr. Khan who broke-up the relationship in early summer of 1997.

British film-maker Tim Haslam made a movie Diana in 2013 based on Diana-Hasnat love affair in which Jewish actress Noami Watts plays the part of princess Diana.

Princess Diana during her April 1996 visit to Pakistan visited Imran Khan and Jemima Khan home dressed in the traditional shalwar kameez out of respect for their Muslim faith (see photo below). The Jewish press blasted Diana for ‘crossing the redline’.

British filmmaker, actor and author Keith Allen in his 2011 documentary , Unlawful Killing (watch below) exposes many lies about princess Diana and tries to answer the questions which the Jewish media has always avoided to report. The documentary was banned in Britain.

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