Farrakhan speaks for Native American Rights

black_and_red_07-28-2015c.jpg

On July 10, 2015, the United National Tribal Youth (UNITY) held its 39th annual conference in a downtown Washington DC hotel. The conference was attended by nearly 1800 young Native American activists.

The leader of the Nation of Islam, Louis Farrakhan, the Afro-American leader hated the most by Jewish ADL, was the keynote speaker.

When a stranger comes and take your land and takes his wealth off our land – that’s not a stranger, that’s an enemy. Take pride who you are. When you walk the earth, walk with a little heaviness because all this land belongs to yours,” Farrakhan said. Listen to his full speech below.

I guess US president Barack Obama has a lot to learn from Farrakhan’s speech about his Black heritage and PA president Mahmoud Abbas about Occupied Palestine.

Richard B. Muhammad, editor The Final Call describes the mood of the conference after Minister Farrakhan reminded the young Native Americans the glorious history of their ancestors long before Christopher Columbus discovered Americas accidently in late 1490s.

UNITY was founded in 1976 by J.R Cook, a member of Cherokee Nation of Oklahoma to help Native youth develop leadership and other skills.

Howard Zinn in his book, A People’s History of United States documents the brutal history of Native American Holocaust committed by the Judeo-Christian European settlers who followed Christopher Columbus, which resulted in the death of estimated over 100 million Natives (Arabs, Africans, Irish, Chinese, and others) in the so-called “New World”.

Native Americans in what is now the United States would continued to be killed by later settlers in enormous numbers, had their land stolen by the ‘world’s most civilized’ government, and see their rights trampled on. This is West’s legacy of bringing the non-White nations to “civilization, Christianity and Democracy” – and the effect of this violent campaign and decades of oppression afterward can still be seen today in the huge disparities between the Native American population and the population in general.

Leave a Reply

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s