Israel will not attack Iran: It’s too costly!

After realizing that Israel cannot win a war with Iran alone, the Zionist regime has come up with a new ‘face-saving’ excuse. Israeli business information group BDI-Coface has projected that Israeli attack against Iran could cost Israel over 167 billion shekels ($42 billion), not to mention thousands of Jews killed and billions of dollars damage to Israeli infrastructure.

However, the real reason behind Netanyahu-Barak reluctance to attack Iran is based on Israeli military hierarchy being afraid  about the prospect of going it alone without full US backing.

I bet, money is a lame excuse – thanks to powerful US Jewish Lobby, American taxpayers’ will be more than glad to contribute $42 billion to ‘save Jews for their Salvation‘.

In fact, Iranians have got tired of Israeli war threats which have been pretty consistent since 2002. For eample, in November 2002, Ariel Sharon called upon world community to attack Iran. This Zionists’ “wolf, wolf, wolf” whining was repeated in October 2003 by Islamophobe David Horovitz warning that Israel was planning to attack Syria and Iran for training Palestinian resistance groups Hamas and Islamic Jihad. During 2004 presidential election, Israel played the “bomb Iran” card – but Dubya Bush refused to sacrify American occupation forces in Iraq in a US-Iran war. As result Israel threatened to go ahead alone to bomb Iran’s nuclear facilities – And the list goes on.

Former Israeli airforce commander, Maj. General Aluf Amos Yadlin in a recent column he wrote in the Washington Post – urged Barack Obama to visit Israel to assure the Zionist regime and Israelis that United States will never allow Iran to “wipe Israel off map”.

On August 20, Lebanese journalist Amal Saad-Ghorayeb, wrote: ‘Iran Attack: Too Big for Israel’.

Aside from belittling what Iran perceives as just another empty Israeli threat, another reason for the Islamic Republic’s dismissive attitude is its confidence in its ability to absorb and respond to such an attack. As acknowledged by former Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense and foreign policy advisor to the Obama campaign, Colin Kahl, “They think it will not hurt them that badly.” In part, Iran’s self-assured stand derives from the strategic value of the 2006 July war in Lebanon; a value which holds whether it serves to deter an Israeli or US strike or to prepare Iran and its most trusted ally, Hezbollah, for retaliation,” wrote Saad-Ghorayeb.

Although the Bush administration helped Israel pre-plan the war on Hezbollah, it was motivated primarily by its intention of carrying out a rehearsal strike on Iran. As disclosed by senior US officials to Seymour Hersh, an Israeli bombing campaign was envisaged as one which would “ease Israel’s security concerns and also serve as a prelude to a potential American preemptive attack to destroy Iran’s nuclear installations.” In this manner, the US and Israel could rehearse for a planned attack on Iran while clearing Hezbollah’s arms out of the way as a means of preempting its anticipated retaliation. However, given the evident failure of this policy, and the “surprising success of Hezbollah’s resistance,” proponents of this plan suffered “a massive setback,” she added.

Sheikh Nasrallah declared in February 2012 that: “Iran will not request anything from Hezbollah and will not desire anything. When this day comes, we are the ones who will sit down and decide what to do.” But given Israeli officials’ repeated references to a strike on Iran as a “wider regional war,” and considering how the fates of Syria, Iran, Lebanon and Palestine have become inextricably bound together, Hezbollah will most likely find itself with no choice but to respond to an Israeli strike on Iran.

Read Amal Saad-Ghorayeb’s entire article here.

Read Dr. Lasha Darkmoon’s article, entitled ‘The Mad Dog’s (Israel’s) Days are Numbered‘, here.

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